few years later in 1728, along with all the land,  to the Earl of Derby. The house was sadly demolished in 1860.

Spellow Mill

On a hill, a few hundred yards to the northwest of Spellow House was Spellow Mill. The windmill was probably built around the time of the original house ~ 1270.

Spellow Mill
Watercolour by Samuel Austin ~1820.

The mill was particularly important because it was built on an ancient meeting place that gave it's the name to the Spellow family Sadly, the Spellow family no longer exists. Perhaps they were wiped out by the plague?. Spellow is Scandinavian for speech-barrow, or speech-hill. The painting clearly shows

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that the mill was built on top of the small hill. The hill was probably an even more ancient meeting place, but later attracted a Scandinavian name, when used by the invading Vikings to make announcements.

Unfortunately, the mill was destroyed by a fire in 1828. When it burnt down, it was noted in the history books that the mill was at least 500 years old. By pure luck, the mill had been the subject of a watercolour shortly before it was destroyed.

Fazakerley House

A large farmhouse built in 1749, by John Hawarden or his son Samual Hawarden, Despite it's name, it had little or no connection to the Fazakerley family.

Fazakerley House

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